Are the crowd level patterns at Walt Disney World completely changing?

It is no secret that crowd levels and patterns have changed since Walt Disney World changed their ticketing prices to coincide with busy times, and with blackout dates on annual passes. But how much has this changed, and have they changed so much that if you base your time of travel around how crowded it is there, do you now change the usual times you go?

We all know the usual slow times at WDW, January through most of February, usually a couple weeks after Easter until Memorial Day,  the last 2 weeks of August really until Jersey Week in early November, and the week after Thanksgiving until the week of Christmas.  But there are also days where certain parks are busier than others. In my experiences, Saturday and Monday are very crowded days at the Magic Kingdom, and Tuesday and Friday have been incredibly slow on a normal week. Websites like Undercover Tourist have crowd calendars that can give you a prediction of how crowd levels should be on a certain day. But, in the last year or 2, I have seen a slight change. The days that have used to be slower are now more crowded. Usually Tuesday’s were a very slow day, now not so much. Are the crowd levels changing to the point you change your game plan on which park to go to on which day? That is to be seen.

Some times of the year now when it has been less crowded, the parks and resorts seem more crowded, and some times during the year when it is very crowded now seem a little less crowded. This seems to coincide with the fact that attendance is down at Walt Disney World, and it seems less people are walking through the 4 theme parks there for one reason or another. I have heard reports that after The initial crowd surge with Avatarland the entire summer has been much slower than normal at Walt Disney World. This most likely has to do with black out dates and the higher ticket prices for this timeframe. You start to think,”Disney has to start doing something to combat this, either lower prices, better deals or do away with blackouts”. Problem with that line of thinking is the fact that Parks and Resorts revenue keeps going up, so crowds may be lower, but the people going are spending more. Also add in with this is the slightly lower labor costs associated with lower crowd volume.  This makes me believe that you won’t be seeing any crazy changes anytime soon with price structuring or lowering of any prices.

Now with all this, would it make you more inclined to visit during the summer if you previously tried to avoid that season, or would you not go during a season that you normally would because it is becoming more crowded? That is for you to decide, I would still continue with your same line of thinking of times of the year to visit. But keep an eye on things, crowd patterns are changing, not saying it’s for good or bad, but they are changing.  Question is will you change with them?

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How does the new Parking fees effect your Walt Disney World budget

I’m sure you have realized by now that Walt Disney World will be charging their guests to park while staying at their resorts. If you are staying at a value resort you will be paying $13 a night to park at your resort, you will be paying $19 for a moderate Resort and $24 for the deluxe resorts. If staying for a week this could add up and eat up some of the money in your budget. I am going to look at how this can effect something things for the average customer and look at some of the thinking behind having these parking fees.

Now a large majority of the guests staying at Walt Disney World Resort do not bring a car to the resort. A large majority fly into Orlando International Airport, use the very convenient Magical Express to drive them to their resort they are staying at. This is a very good perk of staying on Disney Property. Disney also has an extensive transportation system whether it be by bus, boat or monorail, which makes he need for a car on property minimal if actually no need at all. But I do realize there is also a number of families that drive to DisneyWorld. My family used to drive from New Jersey every year, and this added expense can put a hurt of people. We all know he price of staying on property, it isn’t cheap, and now paying $91 to  $168 dollars to park for a 7 night stay just adds to it.

If you were driving and you have a family of four, would that increase in price be enough to make you look at flying more seriously? Probably not, I’d think the recent increase in the price of gas would be more of an issue. If you are a family who is going for the first time and driving or a family who goes once every now and then, is this additional expense going to stop you from visiting? Probably not, it may annoy you and inconvenience you, but in the grand scheme of it it’s a very small cost compared to the price of the resort accommodations, tickets, dining plan, etc. Lets say you stay at a moderate, $200 for a week plus tickets and Dining, $133 seems minute. But to some it may be a big deal. I’ve seen on message boards and social media the outrage of some on this issue. For me, I own DVC and for the most part most of my stays are booked through that, so paying for parking if I ever have a car won’t be an issue as of now for me since if staying at a DVC resort using points I will not be charged. But if I were charged and found having a car was a necessity I would have to find a way to save the parking fees in other ways. It may be one nights going to a quick service for dinner instead of going to a table service, or making lunch in our room rather than going out for lunch. There are many small ways to save big that you wouldn’t think would save you much. Granted some may say it won’t change what we spend and some may say they won’t change a thing. It’s all up to each individual, people will see things differently and to each their own.

Finally, in all honesty  if you fly into MCO  there really is little to no need for a rental car, and I will assume that any of those who do rent a car will think twice about doing so from now on. I used to rent a car mainly because we have been visiting that area for so long we know many good restaurants off site that we love to eat at. Also my mom, sister and the Wife like to go to some of the outlets around the area and do some shopping. But in recent years I’ve found that it’s more of a burden to have the car, especially with Uber and Lyft becoming so popular. For my trip in August, if I can find a great deal on a rental car I may book one, but I won’t be heartbroken if I don’t find one and end up not renting a car.

My next post will look at the ramifications of the parking fees and psychology on them from a Disney viewpoint.

Is there really a best time to get cheapest Airfare?

Since my post yesterday about my hardship in finding cheap airfare, I was thinking about what really is the best times to find the cheapest airfare. The long standing theory is the best time to get that is 2 months out from your departure date. Well without getting too scientific and just going off my observations I’ll dig in further.

Now usually it does seem 2 months out or so is a good time…. usually. Other factors have to be taken into consideration. These can be the time of year, if it’s a holiday season, busy season for the location you are flying to, or if the airport is a popular business destination, such as New York or Chicago. If you are traveling to a large convention town, such as Orlando or Las Vegas, that will play into this also if there is a large convention in town. This will also effect Hotel prices.

But for 2 specific Airlines, Southwest and Jet Blue, I like to check air prices right when the dates come out for booking as long as I know when exactly we are going to be traveling. A lot of times the fares will start out low and work their way up. I am going away to Florida in August, checked Southwest and Jet Blue for fares when they became available. Jet Blue was a little high, but I was able to get Southwest for $180 pp rt, which is a great rate. United usually doesn’t start off cheap, but I’ll check. I’m in NJ so American and Delta don’t have direct flights out and the flights are normally high so inusually don’t even bother to check their rates. Spirit air is usually real cheap, but there are so many issues with them it’s just not worth it.

I realize I’m trying to predict what the airlines do, I’m trying to get a feel of past results and tendencies with them. It isn’t 100% perfect, but I have a pretty good track record trying to feel things out this way.

With the landscape now, rising price of oil may change things, but I personally think the price will stabilize and start coming down more. Some fares may be a little high now because of that, but I don’t think it will be a trend in the future.

Your best bet is to do what I said earlier, check Airlines right when they put the dates available for your date, if nothing just keep an eye on things, check every now and then for rates, check more frequently as you get closer. Keep an eye on the seat map, check to see what amount of seats are available. Granted that is 100% but a decently ok indicator. If there are a lot available, odds are there are still a lot of seats available. If there aren’t well prices will still be high… it’s supply and demand. If there aren’t a lot of seats, if you find an acceptable airfare jump on it. If it seems like there is a decent amount left, wait up. Prices will go down, be patient until you feel you get the right price. Be patient, don’t get nervous and panic. If you miss out, there is always Spirit Air!